ANNIHILATION
CAMAB GIRL TRASH
DEATH DRIVEN

THEY // THEM

I am trying my hardest to be okay with myself

Frustration
Revenge
Disintegration
Death

ANNIHILATION
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anonymously message me 3 things you want to know about me
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hellbib:

Pharmakon-Red Frames-
hellbib:

Pharmakon-Red Frames-
hellbib:

Pharmakon-Red Frames-
hellbib:

Pharmakon-Red Frames-
hellbib:

Pharmakon-Red Frames-
hellbib:

Pharmakon-Red Frames-
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Album Art
2,744 plays Source
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cyberdesert:


Uzumaki adds yet another dimension to the magic circle motif we’ve been tracing. The spiral is, in one sense, an abstract geometrical shape. It has no actual existence in the world, except as a manifestation in the form of a spiral (a snail’s shell, a slice of fish cake). This paradoxical state means that the spiral can only be said to negatively exist - the spiral in itself is never manifest except as a spiral “in” some thing, in the world. This sort of bleed-over effect of the abstract into the concrete world is different from our traditional examples of the magic circle. In Goethe’s Faust, we saw that Faust only encounters the magic circle symbolically, in his contemplation of the abstract symbol of the macrocosmos. But the abstract symbol and the concrete manifestation remain separate; Faust’s contemplation of the symbol in itself does not lead to the evocation of the demons or magic. In Uzumaki, by contrast something else happens in the relationship between the abstract and the concrete, between the symbol and manifestation.  - and it is this contagious, pervasive manifestation that the characters describe as unnatural or strange. O n the other hand, throughout the Uzumaki series, the spiral is more than just a pattern in nature - it is also equivalent to the idea of the spiral itself. That is, the abstract symbol and the concrete manifestation are inseparable, the the point that the outer world of the spiral’s manifestation can “infect” or spread into the ideational world of the spiral as an idea. Beyond a geometrical symbol, and beyond a pattern in nature, the spiral in Uzumaki is ultimately equivalent to the thought itself - but “thought” understood here as not simply being the interior, private thoughts of an individual. Instead, the spiral-as=thought is also “thought” as unhuman, “thought” as equivalent to the world-without-us. In this sense Uzuamki suggests that the Absolute is horrific, in part because it is utterly unhuman.

Eugene Thacker
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afrogrrrlxvx:

I’m kind of freaking out right now.
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runningmermaids:

getting outfit inspirations from anime characters
runningmermaids:

getting outfit inspirations from anime characters
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